This site is about photography and the inner thoughts of photographer Andrew Plath.

Posts from the ‘Trees’ category

Changing Seasons

Every once in a while I like to take a walk along a river.  My river of choice is the Wisconsin which flows for 500 miles from Land O Lakes up north on the border with Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to Prairie du Chen on the Mississippi.   This river amazes me in ways that might seem odd to some people.   It never stops to inspire.

 

I caught these leaves on the Cedar Creek Trail in Rothschild, WI just south of the Domtar Dam.   In one spot, I could find so many possibilities.    It really is amazing what a simple macro lens like the 60 mm Micro-Nikkor f2.8D could capture.   The way the light fell on these young oak trees fascinated me.   With the river in the background, I was able to capture the effect of the changing season with a shallow depth of field.

 

May these images be a feast for your eyes.  For more of my work, please go to http://www.capturewisconsin.com.   Much of my work is available online in a book called “Hidden Gems of Central Wisconsin” at http://www.blurb.com. You might want to check out their special holiday discounts at  http://www.blurb.com/gifts.

autumn-at-home-1-of-1-7 autumn-at-home-1-of-1-6 autumn-at-home-1-of-1-8 autumn-at-home-1-of-1-9 autumn-at-home-1-of-1-10 autumn-at-home-1-of-1-11

Another Look

If you really think of what digital photography has done, you might realize just how things have changed.   Not too many years ago, to take photograph in both color and black and white, you would have to either shoot the image with two identically equipped cameras, or hope to make a print usually from a color negative on pan-chromatic black and white emulsion paper.

The way I use digital photography for this end is to make a black and white conversion of the image in post processing with my editing software on my pc.  I think like that.   I look first at an image in color .  Then I think about how it will look in black and white.

In black and white landscape photography, there are two great photographers who I consider to be mentors.  Clyde Butcher and Ansel Adams, whose primary tool has been the large format film cameras called field cameras for their ability to fold up compactly and be transported to the location with the greatest of ease, produced large images that transported the viewer into the environment where the scene was shot.  While I am not sure that my 10 megapixel D-80 could do that, the enlargements that I have gotten from images taken with that camera do hold up quite well.

To create a black and white image and make it work, it changes the way one thinks.  I generally change from thinking about color and more about tone and texture.   I think more about the surface of that piece of quartzite or the texture of this piece of granite than whether one is red or gray.   I think more about the tone of the image.  I think more of grayscale and the zone system that was originally conceived by Ansel Addams.

The cameras work differently.  With film cameras, this is done with different colored filters on the lens ranging from red to green.  Adams used Red #25 most often.   In digital photography, this is done with the electronic filters in software.

However, you look at it, these scenes are yours to enjoy.

The Quarry in Winter - Black and WhiteThe Quarry Wall in Black and White

On December 28, 2013, my birthday, I joined in with the Friends of Rib Mountain State Park for a day-time snowshoe hike.   I love this park and the big hill that it gives a name to.  I’ve hiked its trails many times.   What a beautiful day it was.  The trees were frosted in a way that nature provides Rib Mountain with its own Christmas decorations.   It speaks to me.  It calls me to come out and help show off the beauty.   My D-80 is almost always in tow on these hikes.   I stop the camera down to ISO 100, use shutter priority and exposure compensation and hold on still since I was not carrying a tripod-pod or even a monopod.

Looking Towards the Valley

TFrom the southern side of Rib Mountain near the top.
From the southern side of Rib Mountain near the top.

The Quarry In Winter

Hello Winter

Cones forming on a tree that my aunt had given me about 15 years ago.

Cones forming on a tree that my aunt had given me about 15 years ago.

The Tree-0080 The Tree-0071I have a passion for the things I see and I have grown to love life in Wisconsin even though it means enduring cold.  The river here in Wausau is so much a part of life.   It offers lot of fascination at each season.  I even doubt  that Wausau could be Wausau without the river.

It shapes our lives from season to season.   Even in the stillness of winter, it is still flowing under the ice and snow churning and driving the turbines that make our electricity.

Christmas happens in winter.  It may also be the winter of our lives when all seems dismal and dark.  God comes to us with the Light of the World.  He comes to us as a baby born in a forgotten manger in a nondescript village in a far corner of the earth.

Winter On The Wisconsin RiverWinter On The Wisconsin

Cones forming on a tree that my aunt had given me about 15 years ago.

Cones forming on a tree that my aunt had given me about 15 years ago.

Even at the onset of winter, there is the hope of new life.  The evergreen trees bear cones and each cone contains the spores that provide that new balsams, spruces, pines, cedars, and other conifers can start anew.

The trees remain green all year.  That is a refreshing sign against the stark reality of the cold whiteness  of winter.

This tree is from my backyard right here in Wausau, WI.

Nature's Ornaments

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